The Cooking Gene: A Journey Through African-American Culinary History in the Old South

Southern food is integral to the American culinary tradition, yet the question of who “owns” it is one of the most provocative touch points in our ongoing struggles over race.

Culinary historian Michael W. Twitty traces the roots of his own family, and the charged politics surrounding the origins of soul food, barbecue, and all Southern cuisine — from the tobacco and rice farms of colonial times to plantation kitchens and backbreaking cotton fields. Through this ancestral culinary history of stories, recipes, genetic tests, historical documents and travels, Twitty reveals the power that food has to bring the kin of the enslaved and their former slaveholders to the table — where they can discover the real America together.











When: Thu., September 7, 2017 at 7:00 pm
Where: 92nd Street Y
1395 Lexington Ave.
212-415-5500
Price: $29
Click here to buy tickets or for more information from the venue's website
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Southern food is integral to the American culinary tradition, yet the question of who “owns” it is one of the most provocative touch points in our ongoing struggles over race.

Culinary historian Michael W. Twitty traces the roots of his own family, and the charged politics surrounding the origins of soul food, barbecue, and all Southern cuisine — from the tobacco and rice farms of colonial times to plantation kitchens and backbreaking cotton fields. Through this ancestral culinary history of stories, recipes, genetic tests, historical documents and travels, Twitty reveals the power that food has to bring the kin of the enslaved and their former slaveholders to the table — where they can discover the real America together.