Love Lives of Sea Creatures: Isabella Rossellini in Person

The reproductive behavior of sea creatures is central to these lyrical and wondrous films by Jean Painlevé, Isabella Rossellini, and Roberto Rossellini. The otherworldly films of Jean Painlevé–a French filmmaker and inventor–capture the spectacle of marine biology with one of the first underwater cameras. The program includes rare screenings of four archival 35mm prints: The Sea Horse (1933); ACERA, or The Witches’ Dance (1972); Shrimp Stories (1964) and The Love Life of the Octopus (1967). Isabella Rossellini’s playfully stylized series Green Porno explores how the starfish, shrimp, squid, and anchovy reproduce. The program also features a rarity, the first film by Roberto Rossellini (Isabella’s father), Fantasia Sottomarina (1940), which is about two fish in love that are threatened by an octopus. The 70-minute program will be followed by a discussion with director and actress Isabella Rossellini and marine chemical biologist Dr. Mandë Holford.











When: Sun., Mar. 26, 2017 at 4:30 pm
Where: Museum of the Moving Image
36-01 35th Ave.
718-777-6888
Price: $15
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The reproductive behavior of sea creatures is central to these lyrical and wondrous films by Jean Painlevé, Isabella Rossellini, and Roberto Rossellini. The otherworldly films of Jean Painlevé–a French filmmaker and inventor–capture the spectacle of marine biology with one of the first underwater cameras. The program includes rare screenings of four archival 35mm prints: The Sea Horse (1933); ACERA, or The Witches’ Dance (1972); Shrimp Stories (1964) and The Love Life of the Octopus (1967). Isabella Rossellini’s playfully stylized series Green Porno explores how the starfish, shrimp, squid, and anchovy reproduce. The program also features a rarity, the first film by Roberto Rossellini (Isabella’s father), Fantasia Sottomarina (1940), which is about two fish in love that are threatened by an octopus. The 70-minute program will be followed by a discussion with director and actress Isabella Rossellini and marine chemical biologist Dr. Mandë Holford.