Mapping the Discursive Landscape

Join us for this mini-conference “Mapping the Discursive Landscape” which grew out of discussions of bringing postcolonial studies into rhetorical scholarship, using selections from Julietta Hua’s Trafficking Human Rights as an example of how such aspirations might be put into practice. To re-orient the words of Hua, the “work of mapping the discursive landscape and the regimes of knowledge” through which international human rights issues become mediated for U.S. audiences demands a transnational feminist rhetorical methodology: a methodology that is transnational in its attention to the various ways national power, privilege, and identity are positioned. This mini-conference will consider alternative readings of narratives that naturalize particular modes of subjectivity when describing forced migration, asylum, and international community. The conference will feature a panel, an interactive exercise of annotating public images of migration, and a keynote speech by Professor Rebecca Dingo, University of Massachusetts Amherst.











When: Fri., April 21, 2017 at 4:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Where: Graduate Center, CUNY
365 Fifth Ave.
212-817-7000
Price: Free
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Join us for this mini-conference “Mapping the Discursive Landscape” which grew out of discussions of bringing postcolonial studies into rhetorical scholarship, using selections from Julietta Hua’s Trafficking Human Rights as an example of how such aspirations might be put into practice. To re-orient the words of Hua, the “work of mapping the discursive landscape and the regimes of knowledge” through which international human rights issues become mediated for U.S. audiences demands a transnational feminist rhetorical methodology: a methodology that is transnational in its attention to the various ways national power, privilege, and identity are positioned. This mini-conference will consider alternative readings of narratives that naturalize particular modes of subjectivity when describing forced migration, asylum, and international community. The conference will feature a panel, an interactive exercise of annotating public images of migration, and a keynote speech by Professor Rebecca Dingo, University of Massachusetts Amherst.