Transplanted Cuisine: A talk with Food Mavens Sarah Lohman and Eve Jochnowitz

Join food mavens Sarah Lohman and Eve Jochnowitz for a delicious treat as they come together at the Museum at Eldridge Street to talk about their culinary research into immigrant food culture, and their insights about the history of American food traditions. Sarah Lohman studied old recipe books, cooked centuries-old dishes, and came to the conclusion that American food is united by eight flavors:  black pepper, vanilla, curry powder, chili powder, soy sauce, garlic, MSG and Sriracha.  When Eve Jochnowitz translated, annotated and adapted The Vilna Vegetarian Cookbook, first published right before World War II, she discovered that its author, Fania Lewando “created a Jewish culinary palette that celebrated nature’s bounty” in meatless meals that had long been viewed as indicators of hardship and sorrow.  Lohman and Jochnowitz share a passion for their subject that is not just theoretical — both cook what they study and will be talking about this as well as their current projects. A light nosh will be served.











When: Tue., April 25, 2017 at 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
Where: Museum at Eldridge Street
12 Eldridge St.
212-219-0888
Price: $14 adults; $10 students and seniors
Click here to buy tickets or for more information from the venue's website
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Join food mavens Sarah Lohman and Eve Jochnowitz for a delicious treat as they come together at the Museum at Eldridge Street to talk about their culinary research into immigrant food culture, and their insights about the history of American food traditions. Sarah Lohman studied old recipe books, cooked centuries-old dishes, and came to the conclusion that American food is united by eight flavors:  black pepper, vanilla, curry powder, chili powder, soy sauce, garlic, MSG and Sriracha.  When Eve Jochnowitz translated, annotated and adapted The Vilna Vegetarian Cookbook, first published right before World War II, she discovered that its author, Fania Lewando “created a Jewish culinary palette that celebrated nature’s bounty” in meatless meals that had long been viewed as indicators of hardship and sorrow.  Lohman and Jochnowitz share a passion for their subject that is not just theoretical — both cook what they study and will be talking about this as well as their current projects. A light nosh will be served.