Acts and Intermissions: Emma Goldman in America

Film Screening conjunction with the exhibit  1917: How One Year Changed the World
A film by Abigail Child

A cinematic collage featuring rare archival footage of NYC from the 1910s, Abigail Child’s new documentary Acts and Intermissions: Emma Goldman in America circles around the life of Emma Goldman and her relationship to the history of protest between then and now. Goldman’s fight for social justice encompassed issues that remain urgent today, and the film’s overlapping of past and present highlights the continuing relevance of her struggle. The film performs a time travel, intercutting moments from Emma’s life with her prescient speeches, weaving industrial era factory labor with computer data centers with Emma’s intimate diaries — to explore human vulnerabilities, compromises and choices. Fervently political, Emma was also passionate and sexual, with beauty/art/humor part of the freedoms for which she was fighting. The film creates a dialogue on individual liberties and anarchism: how we risk and how we are compromised? Questions that have become only more relevant in our current political climate.

 











When: Tue., Sep. 19, 2017 at 7:00 pm
Where: American Jewish Historical Society
15 W. 16th St.
212-294-6160
Price: $10 advance, $12 door
Click here to buy tickets or for more information from the venue's website
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Film Screening conjunction with the exhibit  1917: How One Year Changed the World
A film by Abigail Child

A cinematic collage featuring rare archival footage of NYC from the 1910s, Abigail Child’s new documentary Acts and Intermissions: Emma Goldman in America circles around the life of Emma Goldman and her relationship to the history of protest between then and now. Goldman’s fight for social justice encompassed issues that remain urgent today, and the film’s overlapping of past and present highlights the continuing relevance of her struggle. The film performs a time travel, intercutting moments from Emma’s life with her prescient speeches, weaving industrial era factory labor with computer data centers with Emma’s intimate diaries — to explore human vulnerabilities, compromises and choices. Fervently political, Emma was also passionate and sexual, with beauty/art/humor part of the freedoms for which she was fighting. The film creates a dialogue on individual liberties and anarchism: how we risk and how we are compromised? Questions that have become only more relevant in our current political climate.