Changing Two Minds Is Better Than One—Seminars in Society and Neuroscience

Join the Presidential Scholars in Society and Neuroscience for “Changing Two Minds Is Better Than One: Biological and Behavioral Experimentation Within Complex Social Relationships.” Experimental interventions are becoming an increasingly popular research methodology in the neural and social sciences. Conventionally, animal and human intervention studies try to reduce the variability and complexity of the environment as much as possible. These studies focus on independent individuals, randomly assigning each one to either an experimental condition (intervention) or control condition, and look for changes to the brain and behavior. This seminar is not about conventional intervention research. Instead, we spotlight novel research designs that examine interdependent individuals embedded within complex relational systems, from the interactions of couples, to middle-school friendships, to parent-child dynamics.

Event Participants:

Speakers:
  • Zoe Donaldson, Assistant Professor of Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Howard Markman, John Evans Distinguished Professor of Psychology, Co-Director of the Center for Marital and Family Studies, University of Denver
  • Hana Shepherd, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Rutgers University
Moderator:
  • Noam Zerubavel, Presidential Scholar in Society and Neuroscience, Columbia University

Event Information:

Free and open to the public, but RSVP is required via Eventbrite.











When: Tue., October 15, 2019 at 4:30 pm - 6:30 pm
Where: Columbia University
116th St. & Broadway
212-854-1754
Price: Free
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Join the Presidential Scholars in Society and Neuroscience for “Changing Two Minds Is Better Than One: Biological and Behavioral Experimentation Within Complex Social Relationships.” Experimental interventions are becoming an increasingly popular research methodology in the neural and social sciences. Conventionally, animal and human intervention studies try to reduce the variability and complexity of the environment as much as possible. These studies focus on independent individuals, randomly assigning each one to either an experimental condition (intervention) or control condition, and look for changes to the brain and behavior. This seminar is not about conventional intervention research. Instead, we spotlight novel research designs that examine interdependent individuals embedded within complex relational systems, from the interactions of couples, to middle-school friendships, to parent-child dynamics.

Event Participants:

Speakers:
  • Zoe Donaldson, Assistant Professor of Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Howard Markman, John Evans Distinguished Professor of Psychology, Co-Director of the Center for Marital and Family Studies, University of Denver
  • Hana Shepherd, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Rutgers University
Moderator:
  • Noam Zerubavel, Presidential Scholar in Society and Neuroscience, Columbia University

Event Information:

Free and open to the public, but RSVP is required via Eventbrite.

Buy tickets/get more info now