Crossroads: Art + Native Feminisms

Crossroads: Art + Native Feminisms is a dedicated day of panels, roundtables, and discussions led by indigenous knowledge carriers, artists, community members, elders, academics, and their accomplices on the topic of art and native feminism focused on North America.

Native women across the continent have a long-established tradition of pushing against dominant patriarchal structures through the visual arts, whether in the countless untitled works acquired by historical museums in service of colonial nation-states, the selection of Aboriginal artist Rebecca Belmore to represent Canada at the 2005 Venice Biennale, or Christi Belcourt’s recent Anishinaabe Nation–inspired haute couture collaboration with Valentino. Facing systematic erasure via colonization and historically situated outside of mainstream feminism, native women offer wide-ranging perspectives conceptually better located at the center of the movement, exploring such enduring themes as land recovery, self-determination, and social relations based on respect for all living beings.

This daylong symposium is chaired by Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Independent Artist), Maria Hupfield (Independent Artist), and Kat Griefen (Rutgers University; Queensborough Community College).











When: Sat., February 18, 2017 at 10:15 am - 6:00 pm
Where: Museum of Arts and Design
2 Columbus Circle
212-299-7777
Price: Free
Buy tickets/get more info now
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Crossroads: Art + Native Feminisms is a dedicated day of panels, roundtables, and discussions led by indigenous knowledge carriers, artists, community members, elders, academics, and their accomplices on the topic of art and native feminism focused on North America.

Native women across the continent have a long-established tradition of pushing against dominant patriarchal structures through the visual arts, whether in the countless untitled works acquired by historical museums in service of colonial nation-states, the selection of Aboriginal artist Rebecca Belmore to represent Canada at the 2005 Venice Biennale, or Christi Belcourt’s recent Anishinaabe Nation–inspired haute couture collaboration with Valentino. Facing systematic erasure via colonization and historically situated outside of mainstream feminism, native women offer wide-ranging perspectives conceptually better located at the center of the movement, exploring such enduring themes as land recovery, self-determination, and social relations based on respect for all living beings.

This daylong symposium is chaired by Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Independent Artist), Maria Hupfield (Independent Artist), and Kat Griefen (Rutgers University; Queensborough Community College).

Buy tickets/get more info now