The Drama in Marriage about Secrecy & Being Known

Aesthetic Realism consultants Barbara Allen, Anne Fielding, and Meryl Nietsch-Cooperman conduct this “Understanding Marriage!” class, which is open to all women.

At the July 8th event, these great sentences from Eli Siegel’s groundbreaking lecture Aesthetic Realism and Love will be taken up:
“A complaint of women all through the years is this: somehow the person they see themselves as being, is not the person their husband sees. They do not feel that they are being known. They cannot say this clearly; but they feel lonely. The husband also feels lonely—because two people have adored each other without being understood.
“Yet, people think they can do more in being unknown and misunderstood, really, than in being known.
“Suppose Madeleine says, ‘Rupert represents the outside world. In marrying him, I want to show myself to him more each week. There is no limit to being known. There is no limit to how much I can like the world through being honest, excitingly honest, with Rupert.’ Then Madeline wouldn’t get into that discontented, sour state that the Madeleines of America do get into.”

Through discussions at this event, each woman will get new knowledge, new hope as she sees how the drama of secrecy and being known is a cultural matter. And each woman attending will feel her marriage can have fresh, vibrant, and thrilling meaning!











When: Sat., July 8, 2017 at 11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Where: Aesthetic Realism Foundation
141 Greene St.
212-777-4490
Price: $10
Buy tickets/get more info now
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Aesthetic Realism consultants Barbara Allen, Anne Fielding, and Meryl Nietsch-Cooperman conduct this “Understanding Marriage!” class, which is open to all women.

At the July 8th event, these great sentences from Eli Siegel’s groundbreaking lecture Aesthetic Realism and Love will be taken up:
“A complaint of women all through the years is this: somehow the person they see themselves as being, is not the person their husband sees. They do not feel that they are being known. They cannot say this clearly; but they feel lonely. The husband also feels lonely—because two people have adored each other without being understood.
“Yet, people think they can do more in being unknown and misunderstood, really, than in being known.
“Suppose Madeleine says, ‘Rupert represents the outside world. In marrying him, I want to show myself to him more each week. There is no limit to being known. There is no limit to how much I can like the world through being honest, excitingly honest, with Rupert.’ Then Madeline wouldn’t get into that discontented, sour state that the Madeleines of America do get into.”

Through discussions at this event, each woman will get new knowledge, new hope as she sees how the drama of secrecy and being known is a cultural matter. And each woman attending will feel her marriage can have fresh, vibrant, and thrilling meaning!

Buy tickets/get more info now