Hinge Pictures: Eight Women Occupy the Third Dimension Launch Party

Please join us to celebrate the launch of Hinge Pictures: Eight Women Occupy the Third Dimension featuring works by Sarah Crowner, Julia Dault, Leslie Hewitt, Tomashi Jackson, Erin Shirreff, Ulla von Brandenburg, Adriana Varejão, and Claudia Wieser and published by Siglio Press.

In 1960 George Heard Hamilton published the first complete typographic translation of Duchamp’s The Green Box in English. A trade edition of 1000 copies, the landmark publication circulated and translated Duchamp’s notes and conceptual ambitions for his three-dimensional masterwork, The Bride Stripped Bare By Her Bachelors, Even. And as a book, designed to hinge at its binding, the work fulfilled Duchamp’s conceptual proposal for art that would move from two into three dimensional space.

Hinge Pictures: Eight Women Artists Occupy the Third Dimension is an artist’s book in eight parts—a gorgeous, palimpsestual publication that layers the practices of Sarah Crowner, Julia Dault, Leslie Hewitt, Tomashi Jackson, Erin Shirreff, Ulla von Brandenburg, Adriana Varejão, and Claudia Wieser over the pages, history, and framework of Duchamp’s imagination. With a swiss binding that unveils the spine of the book, and multiple vellum overlays that create layered interlocutions, the book’s physical qualities mirror its conceptual occupations.

Hinge Pictures: Eight Women Artists Occupy the Third Dimension is also companion publication to an exhibition (March 14−June 16) in eight parts, a confrontation with the patrimony of European modernism in the practices of eight leading artists. A literal reading of Duchamp positions The Bride, a nude woman, suspended above a host of ogling bachelors. In his writing, Duchamp narrates both social and physical constraint (“The Bride accepts this stripping”) and formal liberation (“discover true form … develop the principle of the hinge.”). The artists of Hinge Pictures use formal constraint—a commitment to abstraction—in a demonstration of social liberation. Theirs is a knowing, deconstructed rehearsal of form and color, weighted by the errors, limits, and categorical proscriptions of transatlantic Modernism.

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When: Thu., May 16, 2019 at 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Where: Printed Matter
231 Eleventh Ave.
212-925-0325
Price: Free
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Please join us to celebrate the launch of Hinge Pictures: Eight Women Occupy the Third Dimension featuring works by Sarah Crowner, Julia Dault, Leslie Hewitt, Tomashi Jackson, Erin Shirreff, Ulla von Brandenburg, Adriana Varejão, and Claudia Wieser and published by Siglio Press.

In 1960 George Heard Hamilton published the first complete typographic translation of Duchamp’s The Green Box in English. A trade edition of 1000 copies, the landmark publication circulated and translated Duchamp’s notes and conceptual ambitions for his three-dimensional masterwork, The Bride Stripped Bare By Her Bachelors, Even. And as a book, designed to hinge at its binding, the work fulfilled Duchamp’s conceptual proposal for art that would move from two into three dimensional space.

Hinge Pictures: Eight Women Artists Occupy the Third Dimension is an artist’s book in eight parts—a gorgeous, palimpsestual publication that layers the practices of Sarah Crowner, Julia Dault, Leslie Hewitt, Tomashi Jackson, Erin Shirreff, Ulla von Brandenburg, Adriana Varejão, and Claudia Wieser over the pages, history, and framework of Duchamp’s imagination. With a swiss binding that unveils the spine of the book, and multiple vellum overlays that create layered interlocutions, the book’s physical qualities mirror its conceptual occupations.

Hinge Pictures: Eight Women Artists Occupy the Third Dimension is also companion publication to an exhibition (March 14−June 16) in eight parts, a confrontation with the patrimony of European modernism in the practices of eight leading artists. A literal reading of Duchamp positions The Bride, a nude woman, suspended above a host of ogling bachelors. In his writing, Duchamp narrates both social and physical constraint (“The Bride accepts this stripping”) and formal liberation (“discover true form … develop the principle of the hinge.”). The artists of Hinge Pictures use formal constraint—a commitment to abstraction—in a demonstration of social liberation. Theirs is a knowing, deconstructed rehearsal of form and color, weighted by the errors, limits, and categorical proscriptions of transatlantic Modernism.

Join the Facebook event here!

Buy tickets/get more info now