Histories of Access and Persistence of Monolingualism in U.S. Public Higher Education

Transitioning to the Global: Histories of Access and the Persistence of Monolingualism in U.S. Public Higher Education

In this Faculty Membership Talk, Amy Wan (Queens College) considers what it means to cultivate the global citizenship of a student body and how literacy educators are negotiating the increasing transnationalism of U.S. colleges and universities. This presentation examines the seeming contradiction inherent in policies responding to the growing transnationalism of students. Very often multilingualism, a feature of this transnationalism, is posited as a problem to be solved while, simultaneously and somewhat paradoxically, global citizenship of the student body is to be cultivated. Contextualizing discourses about the readiness, language abilities, and inclusion of international and multilingual students in 75 years of commonplace educational rhetorics of access and democracy, Wan locates a historical legacy for current curricular and policy responses that both includes and excludes transnational student bodies during the current rise of the global university.











When: Fri., February 10, 2017 at 4:00 pm
Where: Graduate Center, CUNY
365 Fifth Ave.
212-817-7000
Price: Free
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Transitioning to the Global: Histories of Access and the Persistence of Monolingualism in U.S. Public Higher Education

In this Faculty Membership Talk, Amy Wan (Queens College) considers what it means to cultivate the global citizenship of a student body and how literacy educators are negotiating the increasing transnationalism of U.S. colleges and universities. This presentation examines the seeming contradiction inherent in policies responding to the growing transnationalism of students. Very often multilingualism, a feature of this transnationalism, is posited as a problem to be solved while, simultaneously and somewhat paradoxically, global citizenship of the student body is to be cultivated. Contextualizing discourses about the readiness, language abilities, and inclusion of international and multilingual students in 75 years of commonplace educational rhetorics of access and democracy, Wan locates a historical legacy for current curricular and policy responses that both includes and excludes transnational student bodies during the current rise of the global university.

Buy tickets/get more info now