Jazz & Life—A Celebration!

Musicians and educators with the Aesthetic Realism Theatre Company & the Aesthetic Realism Foundation faculty will present this thrilling event, which will feature:

“The World, as Such, Is Present in Jazz!” Presented by musicians, this is a talk that was given by Eli Siegel, poet, critic, and founder of the education Aesthetic Realism—with musical examples from Louis Armstrong, Baby Dodds, Jelly Roll Morton, & more!

“Feeling Bad, Good Will, & the Blues.” A talk by Ellen Reiss, Aesthetic Realism Chairman of Education, who says: “The blues, as form and meaning, is evidence for this: if a person were to have good will, even when she was feeling blue, depression would stop and beauty would begin.”

“Roughness & Sweetness in Louis Armstrong’s Rendition of ‘I Can’t Give You Anything but Love'” by jazz pianist Alan Shapiro; and

“The Orderly Extreme.” In this talk about Shelby Foote’s novella Ride Out, about a jazz musician, Eli Siegel said: “This is one of the best things about music I know—also about people.  If you can let go and still be orderly, you’re an artist.  The motto for Jazz is: Professor Tiger.”











When: Sat., Aug. 17, 2019 at 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Where: Aesthetic Realism Foundation
141 Greene St.
212-777-4490
Price: $10 Suggested Contribution
Buy tickets/get more info now
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Musicians and educators with the Aesthetic Realism Theatre Company & the Aesthetic Realism Foundation faculty will present this thrilling event, which will feature:

“The World, as Such, Is Present in Jazz!” Presented by musicians, this is a talk that was given by Eli Siegel, poet, critic, and founder of the education Aesthetic Realism—with musical examples from Louis Armstrong, Baby Dodds, Jelly Roll Morton, & more!

“Feeling Bad, Good Will, & the Blues.” A talk by Ellen Reiss, Aesthetic Realism Chairman of Education, who says: “The blues, as form and meaning, is evidence for this: if a person were to have good will, even when she was feeling blue, depression would stop and beauty would begin.”

“Roughness & Sweetness in Louis Armstrong’s Rendition of ‘I Can’t Give You Anything but Love'” by jazz pianist Alan Shapiro; and

“The Orderly Extreme.” In this talk about Shelby Foote’s novella Ride Out, about a jazz musician, Eli Siegel said: “This is one of the best things about music I know—also about people.  If you can let go and still be orderly, you’re an artist.  The motto for Jazz is: Professor Tiger.”

Buy tickets/get more info now