Splashing Around in Reality!

This Dramatic Presentation features:

“Mind and Schools” In this definitive lecture, given by Eli Siegel in 1949, is the understanding children, parents, and educators today are looking for. Mr. Siegel said:

“A child leaves the family and goes to something called a school. The child is meeting the world in a new way…. All learning, if it is honest, means a giving of ourselves to something in such a way that the thing becomes ourselves. If a child learns a new word like door, the spelling of the word door becomes part of him.”

and “Our Two Huge Desires” Discussing the “authentically funny and deeply wild” poem “The Mock Turtle’s Song” from Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland, Ellen Reiss writes:

“Throughout this strange, lovely, really sensible poem, the fish tries to convince the snail to join others in being thrown into the ocean, but the snail doesn’t want to. And every child who ever read or heard this poem, and every adult, was affected because, without knowing it, they were learning about the biggest dispute within themselves.”—The Right of Aesthetic Realism to Be Known, issue 1244

And “When Criticism Is Kindness in Love” A reenactment of an Aesthetic Realism Lesson

“The problem of man and woman is how to have kissing go along with cogitation….If you have anything like a bodily response, do you believe you’re the same person as when you are working out a mathematics problem?” –Eli Siegel











When: Sat., Sep. 16, 2017 at 8:00 pm - 9:30 pm
Where: Aesthetic Realism Foundation
141 Greene St.
212-777-4490
Price: $10 suggested contrib.
Click here to buy tickets or for more information from the venue's website
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This Dramatic Presentation features:

“Mind and Schools” In this definitive lecture, given by Eli Siegel in 1949, is the understanding children, parents, and educators today are looking for. Mr. Siegel said:

“A child leaves the family and goes to something called a school. The child is meeting the world in a new way…. All learning, if it is honest, means a giving of ourselves to something in such a way that the thing becomes ourselves. If a child learns a new word like door, the spelling of the word door becomes part of him.”

and “Our Two Huge Desires” Discussing the “authentically funny and deeply wild” poem “The Mock Turtle’s Song” from Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland, Ellen Reiss writes:

“Throughout this strange, lovely, really sensible poem, the fish tries to convince the snail to join others in being thrown into the ocean, but the snail doesn’t want to. And every child who ever read or heard this poem, and every adult, was affected because, without knowing it, they were learning about the biggest dispute within themselves.”—The Right of Aesthetic Realism to Be Known, issue 1244

And “When Criticism Is Kindness in Love” A reenactment of an Aesthetic Realism Lesson

“The problem of man and woman is how to have kissing go along with cogitation….If you have anything like a bodily response, do you believe you’re the same person as when you are working out a mathematics problem?” –Eli Siegel