‘The Long Island Estates That Inspired The Great Gatsby’ Webinar

While Edith Wharton’s 1920 novel The Age of Innocence pulled back the curtains on New York City’s high society at the time, it was F. Scott Fitzgerald’s 1925 novel The Great Gatsby that shed a light on their extravagant summer estates — and glittering parties — on Long Island’s North Shore. This is the story of some of the most prominent mansions, and families, that likely inspired one of the greatest American novels, and why so few of these architectural wonders are still left standing one hundred years later.

Join New York Adventure Club for a digital exploration of the magnificent estates and mansions of Long Island’s “Gold Coast” that are believed to have inspired The Great Gatsby, the classic 1925 novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald that centered around one of the world’s premier collections of glamour, luxury, and architectural achievement.

Led by historian Gary Lawrance, our virtual showcase of the incredible private properties that once lined Long Island’s North Shore will include:

  • historical overview of the North Shore of Long Island and why it became the social epicenter of New York’s prominent families and known world wide for its wealth, glamour, and dazzling social life
  • Aerial photos circa 1926 showing the endless estates that once were surrounded by ancient forests or overlooked the Long Island Sound — it’s believed over 2,000 of these palatial estates once stood
  • deep dive into some of the most prominent Long Island estates and families including Harbor Hill (a sprawling 100-room French Chateau built for Silver Heir Clarence Mackay), Beacon Towers (an over-the-top fantasy castle built by multi-millionaire and major suffragette Alva Belmont, and later owned by newspaper publishing magnate William Randolph Hearst), and Pembroke (host to decadent parties where high society mixed with Broadway and Hollywood Stars, which is believed to be the inspiration for Jay Gatsby’s parties)
  • Archival photographs showcasing the interiors of these “Gold Coast” mansions, which were all decorated with fine antiques and rare artworks

Afterward, we’ll have a Q&A with Gary — any and all questions about Long Island mansions and estates are welcomed and encouraged!

Can’t make it live? Don’t worry, you’ll have access to the full replay for one week!

See you there, virtually!











When: Wed., Oct. 14, 2020 at 8:00 pm - 9:30 pm

While Edith Wharton’s 1920 novel The Age of Innocence pulled back the curtains on New York City’s high society at the time, it was F. Scott Fitzgerald’s 1925 novel The Great Gatsby that shed a light on their extravagant summer estates — and glittering parties — on Long Island’s North Shore. This is the story of some of the most prominent mansions, and families, that likely inspired one of the greatest American novels, and why so few of these architectural wonders are still left standing one hundred years later.

Join New York Adventure Club for a digital exploration of the magnificent estates and mansions of Long Island’s “Gold Coast” that are believed to have inspired The Great Gatsby, the classic 1925 novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald that centered around one of the world’s premier collections of glamour, luxury, and architectural achievement.

Led by historian Gary Lawrance, our virtual showcase of the incredible private properties that once lined Long Island’s North Shore will include:

  • historical overview of the North Shore of Long Island and why it became the social epicenter of New York’s prominent families and known world wide for its wealth, glamour, and dazzling social life
  • Aerial photos circa 1926 showing the endless estates that once were surrounded by ancient forests or overlooked the Long Island Sound — it’s believed over 2,000 of these palatial estates once stood
  • deep dive into some of the most prominent Long Island estates and families including Harbor Hill (a sprawling 100-room French Chateau built for Silver Heir Clarence Mackay), Beacon Towers (an over-the-top fantasy castle built by multi-millionaire and major suffragette Alva Belmont, and later owned by newspaper publishing magnate William Randolph Hearst), and Pembroke (host to decadent parties where high society mixed with Broadway and Hollywood Stars, which is believed to be the inspiration for Jay Gatsby’s parties)
  • Archival photographs showcasing the interiors of these “Gold Coast” mansions, which were all decorated with fine antiques and rare artworks

Afterward, we’ll have a Q&A with Gary — any and all questions about Long Island mansions and estates are welcomed and encouraged!

Can’t make it live? Don’t worry, you’ll have access to the full replay for one week!

See you there, virtually!

Buy tickets/get more info now