Adam Gopnik on A.J. Liebling’s Bon Vivant! (Between Meals)

No writer has written more enthusiastically about food than A. J. Liebling. Bon Vivant! (Between Meals: An Appetite for Paris) the great New Yorker writer’s last book, is a wholly appealing account of his éducation sentimentale in French cuisine during 1926 and 1927, when American expatriates like Ernest Hemingway and Gertrude Stein made café life the stuff of legends.

Join New Yorker staff critic Adam Gopnik as he discusses A.J. Liebling’s landmark memoir and recounts its influence on his own work, on the occasion of its first publication in French with La Table Ronde publisher.

A native New Yorker who had gone abroad to study, Liebling shunned his coursework and applied himself instead to the fine art of eating – or “feeding,” as he called it. The neighborhood restaurants of the Left Bank became his homes away from home, the fragrant wines his constant companions, the rich French dishes a test of his formidable appetite. is a classic account of the pleasures of good eating, and a matchless evocation of a now-vanished Paris.

In English. Free and open to the public. No RSVP necessary.











When: Wed., Jan. 17, 2018 at 7:00 pm
Where: Albertine
972 Fifth Ave.
212-650–0070
Price: Free
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No writer has written more enthusiastically about food than A. J. Liebling. Bon Vivant! (Between Meals: An Appetite for Paris) the great New Yorker writer’s last book, is a wholly appealing account of his éducation sentimentale in French cuisine during 1926 and 1927, when American expatriates like Ernest Hemingway and Gertrude Stein made café life the stuff of legends.

Join New Yorker staff critic Adam Gopnik as he discusses A.J. Liebling’s landmark memoir and recounts its influence on his own work, on the occasion of its first publication in French with La Table Ronde publisher.

A native New Yorker who had gone abroad to study, Liebling shunned his coursework and applied himself instead to the fine art of eating – or “feeding,” as he called it. The neighborhood restaurants of the Left Bank became his homes away from home, the fragrant wines his constant companions, the rich French dishes a test of his formidable appetite. is a classic account of the pleasures of good eating, and a matchless evocation of a now-vanished Paris.

In English. Free and open to the public. No RSVP necessary.

Buy tickets/get more info now