George Weisz: “New York City and the Chronic Disease Movement in Interwar America”

After World War I, the United States became the first nation to transform chronic diseases into a major political issue, seeing all communicable diseases as a single problem that required a coordinated social response. In this talk, historian George Weisz of McGill University will focus on New York City’s role at the heart of this movement. The city’s medical community centered in The New York Academy of Medicine, as well as other figures in the public health, social welfare, insurance and hospital administration domain, contributed to New York City’s uniquely activist chronic disease programs–which in turn culminated in the creation in 1941 of the Goldwater Chronic Disease Hospital on Welfare (now Roosevelt) Island and in Montefiore Hospital’s pioneering home-care program.











When: Thu., March 23, 2017 at 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm
Where: The New York Academy of Medicine
1216 Fifth Ave.
212-822-7200
Price: $12 general public, $8 seniors, free to students with ID
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After World War I, the United States became the first nation to transform chronic diseases into a major political issue, seeing all communicable diseases as a single problem that required a coordinated social response. In this talk, historian George Weisz of McGill University will focus on New York City’s role at the heart of this movement. The city’s medical community centered in The New York Academy of Medicine, as well as other figures in the public health, social welfare, insurance and hospital administration domain, contributed to New York City’s uniquely activist chronic disease programs–which in turn culminated in the creation in 1941 of the Goldwater Chronic Disease Hospital on Welfare (now Roosevelt) Island and in Montefiore Hospital’s pioneering home-care program.