One Day University | The History of Jazz: America’s Greatest Original Art Form

Jazz was born on February 26, 1917, when a combo from New Orleans called the Original Dixieland Jazz Band walked into a Victor recording studio and cut the first jazz recording: “Livery Stable Blues.” 2017 marks the 100th birthday of jazz! This lecture, designed for jazz fans and newcomers alike, celebrates the origins of the music and its impact on global culture.

Jazz is a genre broad in scope with the power to cross multiple borders: geographical, political, economic, racial, and religious. The key to the history of jazz is its connection to recorded sound. It was the first musical genre shaped by modern technology – the first world-wide music phenomenon. As Professor Celenza demonstrates in this multi-media lecture featuring film clips, dance steps, historic photos, and recordings, jazz has never stopped changing. From the Blues and Dixieland to Swing, BeBop, Cool Jazz, and Fusion, jazz offers something for everyone.

If you’re one of those folks who has always asked “what’s all the fuss about?” When it comes to jazz, you’ll leave the lecture a die-hard fan – guaranteed!

Anna Celenza / Georgetown University
Anna Celenza is the Thomas E. Caestecker Professor of Music at Georgetown University. She is the author of several books, including “Jazz Italian Style: From Its Origins in New Orleans to Fascist Italy and Sinatra.” In addition to her scholarly work, she has served as a writer/commentator for NPR’s Performance Today and published eight award-winning children’s books, among them “Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue” and “Duke Ellington’s Nutcracker Suite.” She has been featured on nationally syndicated radio and TV programs, including the BBC’s “Music Matters” and C-Span’s “Book TV.”











When: Mon., March 13, 2017 at 2:00 pm - 4:30 pm
Where: New York Institute of Technology
1855 Broadway
212-261-1500
Price: $80
Click here to buy tickets or for more information from the venue's website
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Jazz was born on February 26, 1917, when a combo from New Orleans called the Original Dixieland Jazz Band walked into a Victor recording studio and cut the first jazz recording: “Livery Stable Blues.” 2017 marks the 100th birthday of jazz! This lecture, designed for jazz fans and newcomers alike, celebrates the origins of the music and its impact on global culture.

Jazz is a genre broad in scope with the power to cross multiple borders: geographical, political, economic, racial, and religious. The key to the history of jazz is its connection to recorded sound. It was the first musical genre shaped by modern technology – the first world-wide music phenomenon. As Professor Celenza demonstrates in this multi-media lecture featuring film clips, dance steps, historic photos, and recordings, jazz has never stopped changing. From the Blues and Dixieland to Swing, BeBop, Cool Jazz, and Fusion, jazz offers something for everyone.

If you’re one of those folks who has always asked “what’s all the fuss about?” When it comes to jazz, you’ll leave the lecture a die-hard fan – guaranteed!

Anna Celenza / Georgetown University
Anna Celenza is the Thomas E. Caestecker Professor of Music at Georgetown University. She is the author of several books, including “Jazz Italian Style: From Its Origins in New Orleans to Fascist Italy and Sinatra.” In addition to her scholarly work, she has served as a writer/commentator for NPR’s Performance Today and published eight award-winning children’s books, among them “Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue” and “Duke Ellington’s Nutcracker Suite.” She has been featured on nationally syndicated radio and TV programs, including the BBC’s “Music Matters” and C-Span’s “Book TV.”