Why so Few? Women in STEM

Women have been working in science for a millennia but their numbers have not increased. Tonight we will explore this paradox.

Arguments abound regarding this subject… anywhere from “women do not have the aptitude” to “women do not get the opportunity”.

To begin we invite you to take this implicit bias test.

The fact of under-representation of women in STEM remains but no one knows exactly why.

Join us for a lively discussion guest hosted by Niki Athanasiadou. Below find a few items to get you started.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fQyCBTDproE

http://www.aauw.org/research/why-so-few/

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2015/jun/13/tim-hunt-hung-out-to-dry-interview-mary-collins

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/06/magazine/why-are-there-still-so-few-women-in-science.html

http://www.cnn.com/2015/04/13/opinions/williams-ceci-women-in-science/

Dr. Niki Athanasiadou, is a research scientist at the New York University (NYU) using big data, statistics and machine learning to understand our attitudes towards food and healthy lifestyles. Niki holds a Master of Research from the University of York (UK), and received her Ph.D. in Molecular and Cellular Biology from the University of Edinburgh (UK). She has been awarded The Young Biochemist Award from the British Biochemical Society and her work has been published in various scientific journals. Niki is a passionate advocate for science outreach. She has organized outreach events with scientists at NYU, has written online articles about genome sequencing and its applications, and was a guest in the podcast “Data Skeptic” discussing big data and personalized medicine. Since 2015, in collaboration with various non-profits, she has developed the “Thinking like a scientist” talks, classes, and workshops to promote public understanding of the scientific method in New York city.











When: Wed., Apr. 19, 2017 at 6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Where: New York Society for Ethical Culture
2 W. 64th St.
212-874-5210
Price: Free
Click here to buy tickets or for more information from the venue's website
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Women have been working in science for a millennia but their numbers have not increased. Tonight we will explore this paradox.

Arguments abound regarding this subject… anywhere from “women do not have the aptitude” to “women do not get the opportunity”.

To begin we invite you to take this implicit bias test.

The fact of under-representation of women in STEM remains but no one knows exactly why.

Join us for a lively discussion guest hosted by Niki Athanasiadou. Below find a few items to get you started.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fQyCBTDproE

http://www.aauw.org/research/why-so-few/

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2015/jun/13/tim-hunt-hung-out-to-dry-interview-mary-collins

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/06/magazine/why-are-there-still-so-few-women-in-science.html

http://www.cnn.com/2015/04/13/opinions/williams-ceci-women-in-science/

Dr. Niki Athanasiadou, is a research scientist at the New York University (NYU) using big data, statistics and machine learning to understand our attitudes towards food and healthy lifestyles. Niki holds a Master of Research from the University of York (UK), and received her Ph.D. in Molecular and Cellular Biology from the University of Edinburgh (UK). She has been awarded The Young Biochemist Award from the British Biochemical Society and her work has been published in various scientific journals. Niki is a passionate advocate for science outreach. She has organized outreach events with scientists at NYU, has written online articles about genome sequencing and its applications, and was a guest in the podcast “Data Skeptic” discussing big data and personalized medicine. Since 2015, in collaboration with various non-profits, she has developed the “Thinking like a scientist” talks, classes, and workshops to promote public understanding of the scientific method in New York city.