Dinners of the Past: Beefsteak

In 1939, New Yorker writer Joseph Mitchell described a beefsteak as “a form of gluttony as stylized and regional as the riverbank fish fry, the hot-rock clambake, or the Texas barbeque.” MOFAD, in conjunction with chef Josh Stokes and food entrepreneur Franz Aliquo, are bringing back this historic, stylized New York City institution of gluttony with an evening of all you can eat steak and all you can drink beer. No utensils. No napkins. Just an apron between you and a pile of meat.

While eating and drinking your fill, learn the theories on how this event got started in 19th century New York and why some thought it was “debased” from beefsteak scholar Paul Lukas, and finally answer the question of just how much steak you can eat in one night.











When: Thu., February 1, 2018 at 6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Where: Museum of Food and Drink
62 Bayard St., Williamsburg, Brooklyn
718-387-2845
Price: $50-$65
Buy tickets/get more info now
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In 1939, New Yorker writer Joseph Mitchell described a beefsteak as “a form of gluttony as stylized and regional as the riverbank fish fry, the hot-rock clambake, or the Texas barbeque.” MOFAD, in conjunction with chef Josh Stokes and food entrepreneur Franz Aliquo, are bringing back this historic, stylized New York City institution of gluttony with an evening of all you can eat steak and all you can drink beer. No utensils. No napkins. Just an apron between you and a pile of meat.

While eating and drinking your fill, learn the theories on how this event got started in 19th century New York and why some thought it was “debased” from beefsteak scholar Paul Lukas, and finally answer the question of just how much steak you can eat in one night.

Buy tickets/get more info now