Ninety-Nine Years Since Prohibition (Morning Session)

The Center for Women’s History is pleased to present the fourth annual Diane and Adam E. Max Conference on Women’s History, the cornerstone of the Center’s suite of public and scholarly programs. This year, the conference explores the history of Prohibition 100 years after the ratification of the 18th Amendment, which banned the sale and consumption of alcohol in the United States.

Prohibition began on January 20, 1920. For some women and men, this represented the culmination of decades of struggle for temperance, a movement that promised to protect women and families from alcoholism. Many others challenged the new laws, particularly in New York City, where the patrons of speakeasies and ballrooms not only ignored Prohibition, but also transgressed boundaries of gender, race, and sexuality. The Roaring Twenties also witnessed the dramatic growth of law enforcement, as efforts to control the consumption of alcohol led to new kinds of urban policing which themselves generated new forms of inequality. One thing was for certain—by the time Prohibition was repealed in 1933, it had transformed the nation.











When: Sun., March 3, 2019 at 9:00 am - 12:30 pm
Where: New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West
212-873-3400
Price: Free
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The Center for Women’s History is pleased to present the fourth annual Diane and Adam E. Max Conference on Women’s History, the cornerstone of the Center’s suite of public and scholarly programs. This year, the conference explores the history of Prohibition 100 years after the ratification of the 18th Amendment, which banned the sale and consumption of alcohol in the United States.

Prohibition began on January 20, 1920. For some women and men, this represented the culmination of decades of struggle for temperance, a movement that promised to protect women and families from alcoholism. Many others challenged the new laws, particularly in New York City, where the patrons of speakeasies and ballrooms not only ignored Prohibition, but also transgressed boundaries of gender, race, and sexuality. The Roaring Twenties also witnessed the dramatic growth of law enforcement, as efforts to control the consumption of alcohol led to new kinds of urban policing which themselves generated new forms of inequality. One thing was for certain—by the time Prohibition was repealed in 1933, it had transformed the nation.

Buy tickets/get more info now