TimesTalks: Covering Trump SOLD OUT

Don’t miss this unique opportunity to spend an evening with The New York Times journalists covering the Trump administration.

On hand to discuss how correspondents are responding to the new political landscape will be Peter Baker, the White House correspondent for The Times and author of the upcoming book “Obama: The Call of History”; Maggie Haberman, also a White House correspondent for The Times; Jim Rutenberg, the Media columnist and former political correspondent for The New York Times; and Dean Baquet, the executive editor of The New York Times. The relationship between the White House and the press corps has, especially in recent years, been a prickly cat-and-mouse game, with one side trying to control its public message and the other constantly questioning it. The Trump administration, however, has torched that equation by attacking the mainstream press head on, accusing it of unfair bias and worse, outright lying. And the president himself is attacker-in-chief, spearheading the offensive with middle-of-the-night tweets and daily bombardments in public addresses. How are correspondents to respond?











When: Tue., Jun. 27, 2017 at 7:00 pm - 8:15 pm
Where: Symphony Space
2537 Broadway
212-864-1414
Price: $40; ($80 includes a copy of Peter Baker's new book, Obama: The Call of History)
Click here to buy tickets or for more information from the venue's website
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Don’t miss this unique opportunity to spend an evening with The New York Times journalists covering the Trump administration.

On hand to discuss how correspondents are responding to the new political landscape will be Peter Baker, the White House correspondent for The Times and author of the upcoming book “Obama: The Call of History”; Maggie Haberman, also a White House correspondent for The Times; Jim Rutenberg, the Media columnist and former political correspondent for The New York Times; and Dean Baquet, the executive editor of The New York Times. The relationship between the White House and the press corps has, especially in recent years, been a prickly cat-and-mouse game, with one side trying to control its public message and the other constantly questioning it. The Trump administration, however, has torched that equation by attacking the mainstream press head on, accusing it of unfair bias and worse, outright lying. And the president himself is attacker-in-chief, spearheading the offensive with middle-of-the-night tweets and daily bombardments in public addresses. How are correspondents to respond?