Women Artists in Paris, 1850-1900

A Conversation with Laurence Madeline and Bridget Alsdorf

On occasion of the exhibition Women Artists in Paris, 1850-1900, organized by the American Federation of Arts and opening at the Denver Art Museum on October 22, Laurence Madeline, the exhibition’s curator, and Bridget Alsdorf, professor and catalogue contributor, will discuss the work and status of women artists in nineteenth-century Paris and the relationship between that historical moment and contemporary developments.

During the second half of the nineteenth century, as a hub of opportunity and inspiration, Paris welcomed artists into dynamic circles of creative and intellectual dialogue and innovation. However, the persistence of restricting gender norms made it difficult for women to be recognized as creators and pioneers in their own right. Drawn from prominent collections across the United States and abroad, Women Artists in Paris, 1850-1900features more than 80 paintings by 37 artists who helped to fuel the first avant-garde movements and challenged the conservative discourse of the acceptable expressions of femininity.











When: Thu., Sep. 7, 2017 at 7:00 pm
Where: Albertine
972 Fifth Ave.
212-650–0070
Price: Free
Click here to buy tickets or for more information from the venue's website
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A Conversation with Laurence Madeline and Bridget Alsdorf

On occasion of the exhibition Women Artists in Paris, 1850-1900, organized by the American Federation of Arts and opening at the Denver Art Museum on October 22, Laurence Madeline, the exhibition’s curator, and Bridget Alsdorf, professor and catalogue contributor, will discuss the work and status of women artists in nineteenth-century Paris and the relationship between that historical moment and contemporary developments.

During the second half of the nineteenth century, as a hub of opportunity and inspiration, Paris welcomed artists into dynamic circles of creative and intellectual dialogue and innovation. However, the persistence of restricting gender norms made it difficult for women to be recognized as creators and pioneers in their own right. Drawn from prominent collections across the United States and abroad, Women Artists in Paris, 1850-1900features more than 80 paintings by 37 artists who helped to fuel the first avant-garde movements and challenged the conservative discourse of the acceptable expressions of femininity.