IKNS Conversations That Matter: Learning From NASA’s Lessons Learned 

IKNS Conversations That Matter: Learning from NASA’s Lessons Learned

 When: Wednesday, April 22nd, 2020

Where: Online (link will be distributed to attendees prior to event)

Time: 8:00pm-9:30pm

RSVP Here 

Learning from NASA’s Lessons Learned

Organizations around the world are innovating to meet their mission in challenging circumstances. Given the volatility of current events, it is doubly important to be aware of lessons that emerge from these experiments so that we can improve our performance even as we face novel situations.

NASA constantly faces novel situations and must innovate. However, unlike many of our organizations, NASA’s failures have been very public failures. As a result, NASA has become a leader in Lessons Learned. 

In 2016, NASA launched the Apollo, Challenger, Columbia Lessons Learned Program (ACCLLP) as a new way to use the tragedies of the past to ensure success in the future. The ACCLLP encompasses the lessons learned from NASA’s most devastating spaceflight disasters: the Apollo 1 launch pad fire in 1967 that claimed three astronauts’ lives, the 1986 loss of the shuttle Challenger and her seven crew members 73 seconds into flight, and the 2003 shuttle Columbia disintegration and loss of the STS-107 crew upon re-entry into Earth’s atmosphere.  The program also looks at the agency’s near losses, like Apollo 13, and some of its successes, like STS-1, the first launch of the space shuttle in 1981. NASA believes that it is critical that the thousands of new engineers, scientists, executives, and commercial partners who make up the next generation of NASA are able to bridge the lessons of the past to the visions of the future. 

Join Columbia University’s M.S. in Information and Knowledge Strategy program for a Conversation that Matters with Michael Ciannilli, manager of NASA’s Apollo, Challenger, Columbia Lessons Learned Program (ACCLLP) as he shares the story of how NASA learned from crisis and his current work in promoting past lessons learned to ensure future mission success.

Please RSVP in advance of the event.  We will send you an access link upon registration.

Speakers:

Michael Ciannilli

Program Manager, Apollo, Challenger, Columbia Lessons Learned Program (ACCLLP)

NASA

Michael “Mike” Ciannilli is the NASA’s manager of the Apollo, Challenger, Columbia Lessons Learned Program. He assumed this role in 2016, and is responsible for innovatively and effectively sharing the lessons of the past to help ensure future success.

As manager of this agency level program, Ciannilli oversees the Columbia Research and Preservation Office, which preserves all Columbia artifacts, as well as the loan program, which loans out Columbia artifacts for research and academic purposes. In addition, he gives lessons learned tours for NASA engineers, scientists, interns, executives, commercial partners, and others. During these tours, he uses the stories of Apollo 1, Challenger and Columbia to share what has been learned from these past mishaps to prevent recurrence in future missions. Ciannilli also does lessons learned events at Kennedy Space Center where he works to bring these past experiences and the emotions behind the accidents alive through multimedia and storytelling; these events will be expanding across the agency. 

Mary Abraham

Academic Director, Information and Knowledge Strategy

Senior Lecturer in the Discipline of Information and Knowledge Strategy 

Mary Abraham is a Senior Lecturer and Academic Director for the Master of Science in Information and Knowledge Strategy (IKNS) program at Columbia University’s School of Professional Studies.  

A knowledge management practitioner, thought leader, and teacher,  Mary Abraham has also built an international consulting practice facilitating collaboration, strategic conversations, and interactive educational sessions for a variety of for-profit and nonprofit organizations. Learn more.

Dr. Ed Hoffman

Senior Lecturer in the Discipline of Information and Knowledge Strategy

Dr. Ed Hoffman is a Senior Lecturer for the Master of Science in Information and Knowledge Strategy (IKNS) program at Columbia University’s School of Professional Studies.  

Dr. Hoffman retired from NASA as a senior executive after 33 years. He was appointed the first NASA Chief Knowledge Officer in 2011 and held responsibility for system-wide strategy, integration, and deployment of knowledge services. Prior to this role, he was the founding director of the NASA Academy of Program/Project and Engineering Leadership (APPEL) serving in this role for over 20 yearsLearn more. 

Questions can be directed to [email protected]











When: Wed., Apr. 22, 2020 at 8:00 pm - 9:30 pm
Where: Columbia University
116th St. & Broadway
212-854-1754
Price: Free
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IKNS Conversations That Matter: Learning from NASA’s Lessons Learned

 When: Wednesday, April 22nd, 2020

Where: Online (link will be distributed to attendees prior to event)

Time: 8:00pm-9:30pm

RSVP Here 

Learning from NASA’s Lessons Learned

Organizations around the world are innovating to meet their mission in challenging circumstances. Given the volatility of current events, it is doubly important to be aware of lessons that emerge from these experiments so that we can improve our performance even as we face novel situations.

NASA constantly faces novel situations and must innovate. However, unlike many of our organizations, NASA’s failures have been very public failures. As a result, NASA has become a leader in Lessons Learned. 

In 2016, NASA launched the Apollo, Challenger, Columbia Lessons Learned Program (ACCLLP) as a new way to use the tragedies of the past to ensure success in the future. The ACCLLP encompasses the lessons learned from NASA’s most devastating spaceflight disasters: the Apollo 1 launch pad fire in 1967 that claimed three astronauts’ lives, the 1986 loss of the shuttle Challenger and her seven crew members 73 seconds into flight, and the 2003 shuttle Columbia disintegration and loss of the STS-107 crew upon re-entry into Earth’s atmosphere.  The program also looks at the agency’s near losses, like Apollo 13, and some of its successes, like STS-1, the first launch of the space shuttle in 1981. NASA believes that it is critical that the thousands of new engineers, scientists, executives, and commercial partners who make up the next generation of NASA are able to bridge the lessons of the past to the visions of the future. 

Join Columbia University’s M.S. in Information and Knowledge Strategy program for a Conversation that Matters with Michael Ciannilli, manager of NASA’s Apollo, Challenger, Columbia Lessons Learned Program (ACCLLP) as he shares the story of how NASA learned from crisis and his current work in promoting past lessons learned to ensure future mission success.

Please RSVP in advance of the event.  We will send you an access link upon registration.

Speakers:

Michael Ciannilli

Program Manager, Apollo, Challenger, Columbia Lessons Learned Program (ACCLLP)

NASA

Michael “Mike” Ciannilli is the NASA’s manager of the Apollo, Challenger, Columbia Lessons Learned Program. He assumed this role in 2016, and is responsible for innovatively and effectively sharing the lessons of the past to help ensure future success.

As manager of this agency level program, Ciannilli oversees the Columbia Research and Preservation Office, which preserves all Columbia artifacts, as well as the loan program, which loans out Columbia artifacts for research and academic purposes. In addition, he gives lessons learned tours for NASA engineers, scientists, interns, executives, commercial partners, and others. During these tours, he uses the stories of Apollo 1, Challenger and Columbia to share what has been learned from these past mishaps to prevent recurrence in future missions. Ciannilli also does lessons learned events at Kennedy Space Center where he works to bring these past experiences and the emotions behind the accidents alive through multimedia and storytelling; these events will be expanding across the agency. 

Mary Abraham

Academic Director, Information and Knowledge Strategy

Senior Lecturer in the Discipline of Information and Knowledge Strategy 

Mary Abraham is a Senior Lecturer and Academic Director for the Master of Science in Information and Knowledge Strategy (IKNS) program at Columbia University’s School of Professional Studies.  

A knowledge management practitioner, thought leader, and teacher,  Mary Abraham has also built an international consulting practice facilitating collaboration, strategic conversations, and interactive educational sessions for a variety of for-profit and nonprofit organizations. Learn more.

Dr. Ed Hoffman

Senior Lecturer in the Discipline of Information and Knowledge Strategy

Dr. Ed Hoffman is a Senior Lecturer for the Master of Science in Information and Knowledge Strategy (IKNS) program at Columbia University’s School of Professional Studies.  

Dr. Hoffman retired from NASA as a senior executive after 33 years. He was appointed the first NASA Chief Knowledge Officer in 2011 and held responsibility for system-wide strategy, integration, and deployment of knowledge services. Prior to this role, he was the founding director of the NASA Academy of Program/Project and Engineering Leadership (APPEL) serving in this role for over 20 yearsLearn more. 

Questions can be directed to [email protected]

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