The Resistance of Translation: Gender Studies Today

Anne Emmanuelle Berger, Cornell University

From the start, women’s and gender studies developed along a transatlantic epistemological and geopolitical axis. An interdisciplinary field, they required and fostered difficult conversations between disciplines which had each developed their own conceptual language. They are thus centrally concerned with crossing(s), whether crossing(s) functions as a political goal, a meta-metaphor for the field’s variegated theoretical endeavor, or as the name of a multi-faceted epistemological problem. This workshop focuses on the problem of translation as a form and act of crossing in the geopolitical context of globalization. It asks whether translation, a neo-humanist practice of transnational exchange premised on the irreducibility of idioms and the hospitality to differences can withstand the homogenizing pull of globalization. And it asks what the collapse of differences might do to an intellectual, political and social field whose very “raison d’être” has been and continues to be the excavation of unrecognized or unwanted differences and the promotion of plurality.











When: Fri., Sep. 22, 2017 at 12:30 pm
Where: Columbia University
116th St. & Broadway
212-854-1754
Price: Free
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Anne Emmanuelle Berger, Cornell University

From the start, women’s and gender studies developed along a transatlantic epistemological and geopolitical axis. An interdisciplinary field, they required and fostered difficult conversations between disciplines which had each developed their own conceptual language. They are thus centrally concerned with crossing(s), whether crossing(s) functions as a political goal, a meta-metaphor for the field’s variegated theoretical endeavor, or as the name of a multi-faceted epistemological problem. This workshop focuses on the problem of translation as a form and act of crossing in the geopolitical context of globalization. It asks whether translation, a neo-humanist practice of transnational exchange premised on the irreducibility of idioms and the hospitality to differences can withstand the homogenizing pull of globalization. And it asks what the collapse of differences might do to an intellectual, political and social field whose very “raison d’être” has been and continues to be the excavation of unrecognized or unwanted differences and the promotion of plurality.