Tillmann Taape – The Striped Layman: Visual Culture and the Politics of Vernacular Medical Knowledge in Early German Print

The visual and rhetorical trope of the ‘striped layman’ began to appear in print in the Southern German lands in the late fifteenth century. Taking as its starting point the numerous woodcut illustrations in the works of the surgeon-apothecary Hieronymus Brunschwig, some of the earliest medical books printed in German, this lecture explores the striped layman as a social and intellectual in-betweener, suggesting how we can read woodcuts which appear interchangeable and merely decorative as visual arguments intervening in contemporary debates about lay education, vernacular print, and medical practice.











When: Wed., January 30, 2019 at 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Where: Columbia University
116th St. & Broadway
212-854-1754
Price: Free
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The visual and rhetorical trope of the ‘striped layman’ began to appear in print in the Southern German lands in the late fifteenth century. Taking as its starting point the numerous woodcut illustrations in the works of the surgeon-apothecary Hieronymus Brunschwig, some of the earliest medical books printed in German, this lecture explores the striped layman as a social and intellectual in-betweener, suggesting how we can read woodcuts which appear interchangeable and merely decorative as visual arguments intervening in contemporary debates about lay education, vernacular print, and medical practice.

Buy tickets/get more info now