What She Ate

Everyone eats, and food touches on every aspect of our lives — social and cultural, personal and political.

Food stories can be as intimate and revealing as stories of love, work or coming-of-age. Culinary historian Laura Shapiro takes us on a journey into the lives of six notable women from the point of view of the kitchen and the table, and unveils what they have in common with each other (and us). These women include Dorothy Wordsworth, whose food story transforms our picture of the life she shared with her famous poet brother; Rosa Lewis, the Edwardian-era Cockney caterer who cooked her way up the social ladder; Eleanor Roosevelt, First Lady and rigorous protector of the worst cook in White House history; Eva Braun, Hitler’s mistress, who challenges our warm associations of food, family and table; Barbara Pym, whose witty novels upend a host of stereotypes about postwar British cuisine; and Helen Gurley Brown, the editor of Cosmopolitan, whose commitment to ’having it all’ meant having almost nothing on the plate except a supersized portion of diet gelatine.











When: Mon., Sep. 25, 2017 at 7:00 pm
Where: 92nd Street Y
1395 Lexington Ave.
212-415-5500
Price: $29
Click here to buy tickets or for more information from the venue's website
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Everyone eats, and food touches on every aspect of our lives — social and cultural, personal and political.

Food stories can be as intimate and revealing as stories of love, work or coming-of-age. Culinary historian Laura Shapiro takes us on a journey into the lives of six notable women from the point of view of the kitchen and the table, and unveils what they have in common with each other (and us). These women include Dorothy Wordsworth, whose food story transforms our picture of the life she shared with her famous poet brother; Rosa Lewis, the Edwardian-era Cockney caterer who cooked her way up the social ladder; Eleanor Roosevelt, First Lady and rigorous protector of the worst cook in White House history; Eva Braun, Hitler’s mistress, who challenges our warm associations of food, family and table; Barbara Pym, whose witty novels upend a host of stereotypes about postwar British cuisine; and Helen Gurley Brown, the editor of Cosmopolitan, whose commitment to ’having it all’ meant having almost nothing on the plate except a supersized portion of diet gelatine.